Ceibos and Palo Santo: Magical Trees of Coastal Ecuador

Without questuion, my favorite trees here on the coast are ceibos and palosanto. We’ll start this post with the ceibos since they are such a conspicuous tree and usually lead newcomers to ask, “What are THOSE??”

The province of Manabi is known for their ceibo trees

 

Ceibo trees (pronounced “SAY-bo”) are a striking feature of the coastal Ecuadorian landscape. Straight from a Tim Burton film or a page out of Dr. Seuss, these large trees feature bright green bulbous trunks, prominent buttresses and a disarray of heavy limbs extending in all directions.

Ceibo located on the hillside overlooking San Clemente

Ceibo trees have leaves only during the rainy season (or if they’re located in a well-irrigated piece of farmland)

 

Ecuadorian ceibos (Ceiba trichistandra) are one of 10 species of tropical and neotropical trees classified as ceibas or kapoks. Kapok is the universal name given to the silky fluff  produced by the ceibo fruits.

Ceibo tree full of kapok (from Gary Scott’s website)

 

Historically, the super soft kapok fibers were collected and used to fill pillows, mattresses, stuffed dolls, etc. In addition, the waxy coating found on the fibers make the fluff resistant to water and highly buoyant; thus, kapok was used worldwide until the mid 1900s in life preservers, life vests and seat cushions. Today, there are still a couple of small communities in Manabi that collect the cotton to make pillows and mattresses for sale.

Kapok cotton (taken from a site with other interesting ceibo information and photos)

 

Here in the dry coastal forests, ceibos spend much of the year without any leaves, a condition called drought-deciduousness.  They have adapted to this stress in a colorful way by photosynthesizing through its trunk (hence the trunk’s bright green pigments).

Shrek-green colored trunk of a giant ceibo

 

The wood of the ceibo is soft, light and brittle and therefore not useful for construction, making furniture, etc.  Tom and I often mused that ceibos would make an awesome tree house for when we had kids until one day we got up close to one and were surprised to find that its trunk was covered in large, intimidating spikes. This adaptation serves to protect the soft wood of young trees; as ceibos age and become less vulnerable to threats of being eaten or toppled, their bark tends to lose its thorns.

Close up of a ceibo’s spikes

 

Owing to their undeniable charisma, many artists are inspired to feature ceibos in their artwork. Below is a custom ceibo painting created for us by our artist friend Kerri who beautifully captured the vivid, whimsical nature of these magnificent trees.

Ceibo painting by Kerri of Boca Tintina (feel free to contact us if you’d like to get in touch with the artist to see more of her work for sale)

 

Palo Santo-Aromatic Gem of the Coast

Unlike ceibos, palosanto trees are all about subtlety. Their drab appearance makes them nearly impossible to distinguish from many of the other scraggly trees and bushes found in the dry coastal forests; however, what unmistakably sets them apart is their soothing, sweet, musky scent. One of my favorite olfactory pleasures is the aroma of palosanto wafting out of the hillsides after a light rain.

Palo santo trees are not beautiful to look at but possess a very pleasing, gentle aroma

 

In the same family as myrrh and frankincense, palo santo (Bursera graveolens) literally means “holy wood” and has been used by shamans since pre-Incan times for clearing negative energies and healing.

Today, locals frequently burn dry sticks of palo santo to produce a rich, aromatic smoke to keep mosquitoes away. The sticks are also used to produce a tea to help cure symptoms related to the flu and asthma.

Incense cones and burner that we purchased from the artesanal palo santo store located in Puerto Lopez

 

Use of essential oils of palo santo is becoming increasingly popular worldwide and is said to contain many healing properties to treat a plethora of maladies including arthritis, allergies, inflammation, cold and flu symptoms, depression, and anxiety to name a few. The oils are used directly on the skin in key areas (wrist, temples, soles of feet, etc.), can be diluted with other oils such as almond to produce massage oils or spritzers, and used in aromatic diffusers.

Palo santo products we’ve bought from the store in Puerto Lopez : incense cones, essential oil, and lotion

 

Palo santo trees themselves are relatively short-lived, approximately 40 years. The oils are extracted only from fallen, dead trees so it is important to buy products from sources who collect only naturally-fallen trees and who are involved in replanting efforts. Deltatau Palosanto in Puerto Lopez is one of those sources (we don’t have any affiliation with them–we just like their products).

 

Ceibos and palo santo trees represent just two of the incredible and diverse plant species found in this region. There are countless ideas for business niches left to be filled to promote greater education and appreciation of the dry coastal forest ecosystem. Examples might include leading hiking, mountain biking and birdwatching tours, the manufacture and sale of products directly using kapok fibers, or even photo-based souvenir products such as ceibo post cards and calendars, neither of which can be found here, at least to my knowledge. Like so many things in Ecuador, the possibilities are endless.

 

The Whales are Back

From roughly the end of June through September, the humpback whales can be seen along Ecuador’s coastline. Each year they make the long migration from Antarctica to breed in Ecuador’s warm Pacific waters.

Breaching humpback whale. BTW, I stole this image from http://ecuador.travel/en/what-to-do-in-ecuador/whale-watching/whale-watching-in-ecuador.html). Check out that site to learn more about whales in Ecuador.

To attract the ladies, male whales put on an impressive display of showmanship, launching their 40 ton bodies out the water, slapping their gargantuan tails against the water surface and spewing water like Old Faithful from their blowhole. The bigger the performance, the better their chances of being selected by a discriminating lady whale.

By far the most popular place for whale watching in Ecuador is Puerto Lopez. Whale watching boat tours leave daily and offer the option of also visiting Isla de la Plata where  three species of boobies (masked, red-footed, and blue-footed) can be seen. 

Mama blue-footed booby and her new baby

This time of year is the booby breeding season too and you are likely to see lots of adorable baby birds standing alongside their nests which are located on the ground amongst the desert scrub.
Fortunately for me and Tom, it is also possible to see the humpbacks (and an occasional blue-footed booby) from our stretch of beach here in Crucita. Just yesterday a couple of our clients watched several breaching whales in amazement from the deck of Hostal Cruzita.
Love this time of year!